Technically, an apostille never goes out after exposure. However, there are factors that can make an aposted document unusable in certain situations. If you intend to use a document or certificate on which you purchased an apostille outside the agreement, you may need to re-process it. For example, if you are applying for a work permit in China, the apostille must have been issued in your documentation within the last six months to be valid for your application. The apostille does not contain information on the quality of the content of the underlying document, but attests to the signature (and the ability of the person who placed it) and the accuracy of the seal/cachet on the document to be certified. In 2005, the Hague Conference interviewed its members and in December 2008 produced a report expressing serious concerns about the diplomas and diplomas of production plants. The possible misuse of the system was highlighted: “The possible use of graduate mill qualifications to circumvent migration controls, perhaps by potential terrorists, is of particular concern.” (Page 5) The risk arises from the fact that the various government marks give the document a touch of authenticity without anyone checking the underlying document. “An official certificate can be issued to a copy of a graduate mill qualification, and then issued with an apostille, without anyone ever checking the signature of the diploma, much less the content of the diploma.” (Page 7) Other Member States have indicated that “they would be required to issue an apostille for the certification of a certified copy of a diploma from a certification plant.” (Page 15) The Evaluation Committee of the Hague Conference expressed doubts as to whether this issue could affect the whole convention. “… Apostille “does not look through certification” and does not refer to the diploma itself …

There is a clear risk that such practices will end up jeopardizing the effectiveness and hence the success of the implementation of the Apostille Convention. (Page 5) [14] Some member states of the Apostille Agreement will request additional levels after an apostille, depending on usage. If you want to get married z.B in Greece, you will need a translation of your apostiller documents, which must be checked at the Greek consulate[16] before you can present them for your marriage permit in the country. It is advisable with whom you present the documents, what the requirements will be in each case. In February 2009, the Hague Conference recommended that the text of the Apostille be amended to clarify that only the seal and signature have been authenticated. The text to be added is as follows: a state-issued apostille document does not require additional certification by the U.S. State Department or legalization by a U.S. embassy or consulate abroad to be recognized in a participating country. The U.S. State Department will not issue apostilles for state-issued documents. The apostille itself is a form of buffer or printing composed of ten standard numbered fields. At the top of it is the text Apostille, under which the text of the Hague Convention of 5 October 1961 (French for “Hague Convention of 5 October 1961”).

This title must be written in French for the apostille to be valid (Article 4 of the Convention). In the numbered fields are added the following information that may be in the official language of the authority that publishes them or in a second language: An apostille from The Hague, issued by the state of Alabama The following checkpoints should help you decide if you need an apostille.